Patrick Mahomes has been the talk of the NFL this season. He's leading the league in most passing categories as a 2nd-year player in his first season as a starter. He took all the expectations and blew them out of the water. He's made national headlines since his pro-day and things have absolutely skyrocketed this year.

He's the face of the franchise in Kansas City with a roster full of stars. He's a local hero and humanitarian. People are comparing him to Hall of Famers and he just passed Chiefs legend for most touchdowns thrown in a season. Patrick Mahomes and the Chiefs only have one loss on the season and it was on the road against Tom Brady and the Patriots.

It seemed like Patrick Mahomes could do no wrong, and then it all unraveled.

In an article praising Mahomes for his generational arm talent, a throwaway story about Patrick Mahomes' affinity for ketchup was ripped out of context and strewn across social media. I mean, even when damning condiment controversy is dropped on Mahomes, it comes from an article with this headline: "The Radical Confidence of Patrick Mahomes: He is the rarest of quarterbacks, capable of making the impossible look routine. So where did his gifts come from -- and where do they lead from here?"

The excerpt in question is a story that begins with the question, "What's it like to be famous?" From there, the author of the Espn.com article writes:

For one thing, it means he eats less ketchup. He spent most of his life putting ketchup on everything. He would get bottles of it for his birthday. But now that everyone is watching every move he makes, he is sheepish about ordering ketchup. At a restaurant recently, his mom, Randi, recognized an unfilled desire as he dove into a steak. 'Just ask for it,' Randi said. 'I know you want it.' Patrick wouldn't. So she asked for the ketchup and slipped it to him.

A seemingly innocent affection for ketchup caught the Twittersphere by storm.

Some Kansas City Chiefs fans propositioned a trade to Oakland after the blasphemous bovine botchery came to light, though the trade was juxtaposed by solidarity:

Other fans posited that Mahomes was no longer the MVP after the ketchup catastrophy.

The solidarity within the Kansas City community is no surprise, as Michael McDonald from Staking the Plains points out:

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The mark of any great quarterback isn't that he's perfect; it's that he bounces back after a negative play. The truly great ones can have a terrible first half and catch fire when it matters to lead a comeback. The GOATs in the league are best on 3rd and long. The spectacular happens when the chips are on the table. And that's exactly how Mahomes responded.

He copped to putting his ketchup on his steak, and then doubled down with the fact he puts it on his macaroni and cheese, too. You have to respect a man who's unashamed of their beliefs. This is where the story gets interesting. Ketchup brands took notice of young Mahomes and the international attention his condiment concerns collected.

Heinz offered Mahomes a lifetime supply of ketchup if he can throw for 57 touchdowns this season. (The NFL record is 55, and he has 31 through 10 games.)

Not to be one-upped, Whataburger wants to send Mahomes a no-strings-attached care package:

Mahomes, however, could care less about the package. He just wants to open up a Whataburger right there in Kansas City! Talk about taking a deep shot.

It's been a wild week for young Patrick Mahomes, but his bounce-back has been incredible. I wouldn't be surprised to see Mahomes in a national ketchup campaign within six months. And the next time I'm in Kansas City, I'll be eating at Whataburger.

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You can listen to the Rob Breaux Show weekdays from 7-9 a.m. on 1340 the Fan. Chad Hasty joins the show today to discuss Patrick Mahomes eating ketchup on his steak and mac and cheese.