Early this week, Texas Tech athletics announced positive COVID-19 tests inside the football program. They didn't, however, release the number of positive cases, rather just announcing three programs had an undefined number of positive tests.

This comes on the heels of the Red Raider men's basketball team also announcing that they had positive tests for the coronavirus.

Last week, Houston football canceled their summer practices after they saw six confirmed tests in their initial tests.

Now, the biggest team in Texas, and one of the biggest programs in the country, has announced 13 positive COVID-19 tests and 10 additional self-isolations due to contact tracing. The Longhorns also confirmed four players who tested positive for antibodies.

This announcement comes on the heels of Don Williams at the Lubbock Avalanche-Journal calling for the Texas Tech Athletic Department to be more forthcoming about the actual number of positive tests within the football program.

Williams mentioned SMU and Baylor in the column as programs that have released detailed notes on their respective positive tests.

The call for Texas Tech University to be more open is intertwined with the City of Lubbock announcing record numbers this week.

Williams had more on that in his column:

A little more clarity on the COVID situation is in order at the moment, because the City of Lubbock just announced new daily highs for case numbers. On Tuesday, the city reported 61 new cases, with 46 being in the 20-to-29 age group. On Monday, it reported 37 new cases, tying the previous single-day high from mid-April, with 20 falling in the 20-to-29 age range. Both days, there were five new cases apiece in those age 10 to 19.

It's not that we need to know who is testing positive, but the context for these ballooning Lubbock numbers would help to give the outbreak some relief if a large number came from outside the city due to Texas Tech athletes coming back to Lubbock.

Williams also joined Ryan Hyatt's Raiderland on Thursday to talk with Hyatt about letting Matt Wells get in front of a microphone and be the talented, candid speaker he's known as in Lubbock.

Listen to that entire interview below: