Get our free mobile app

Okay friends, we need to have a little talk.

I, like many of you, am tired of masks and of the coronavirus pandemic. I, like many of you, was also happy when Texas Governor Greg Abbott ended the mask mandate in our state.

I'm happy to take my mask off and never wear it again. I don't even blame some of you who went out and bought a ton of masks from throwing them away and even burning them (I've seen your videos).

Having said all of that, I come to you asking for you to stop doing one thing. Please stop throwing your masks out in parking lots, the side of the road or out your window while driving down the street. The little blue mask tumbleweeds aren't cute, and our farmers and ranchers have enough to deal with blowing around. The last thing they need are hundreds of masks ending up on their land during the next dust storm.

At first, I'd mainly see the masks in the parking lot of my local Walgreens or Market Street. Now they seem to be everywhere, blowing around like plastic bags and foam cups.

They are ugly; they're trash; and no one wants to pick up your dirty mask that you've been breathing into. Be an adult and do what the rest of us do with masks: rip it off and toss it in your car somewhere. Or just throw it away in the trashcan. There are plenty of those around.

Lubbock already has a lot of trash blowing around. Don't add to the problem with your dirty little mask.

LOOK: The most expensive weather and climate disasters in recent decades

Stacker ranked the most expensive climate disasters by the billions since 1980 by the total cost of all damages, adjusted for inflation, based on 2021 data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The list starts with Hurricane Sally, which caused $7.3 billion in damages in 2020, and ends with a devastating 2005 hurricane that caused $170 billion in damage and killed at least 1,833 people. Keep reading to discover the 50 of the most expensive climate disasters in recent decades in the U.S.

 

KEEP READING: Get answers to 51 of the most frequently asked weather questions...