Here's a problem we probably won't encounter too often in Lubbock, but it's good to know anyway.

If the hand sanitizer that you keep in your car freezes (You DO have some in your car, don't you?) you should throw it away immediately.

Now, I know what you're thinking. Because it was the first thing I thought. If hand sanitizer is alcohol-based, it shouldn't freeze. That's true. Alcohol-based hand sanitizer shouldn't freeze unless it gets really cold. Like fifty below zero cold. I've lived through Minnesota winters so trust me, if it gets that cold in Texas, it's a pretty safe bet none of us are going anywhere in our cars because unless they're in a heated garage they're not gonna want to start. And you're not going to want to get outside at all.

So why throw it away if it freezes? If your allegedly alcohol based hand sanitizer freezes it didn't have nearly enough alcohol in it in the first place and was useless to prevent the spread of COVID-19. While there are a few alcohol-free sanitizers available, most of what we find on store shelves is alcohol-based. Out of those, there may be a few knockoffs that list alcohol as a primary ingredient, but don't actually contain enough, if any at all.

If you get in your car on a 20 degree morning and notice your hand sanitizer has turned to ice, check the label. If the label lists a high percentage of alcohol you didn't get what you expected. Throw it away and buy some fresh sanitizer.

Keep those masks up, keep cleaning those hands, and stay strong.

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